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NEWS ADMIN

Mahamad Rodzi Abdul Ghani

DATE

11/07/2001

NEWS PROVIDER

Mahamad Rodzi Abdul Ghani

NEWS SOURCE

NULL

CATEGORY

HEADLINE

As prices skyrocket, Brazil worried about sourcing
As prices skyrocket, Brazil worried about sourcing non-GM soyBrazil,7/9/2001- Retailers' GM free policies could prove unsustainable assources of non-GM soya dry up and prices rocket, according to reports fromBrazil, a leading source of GM-free soya.Brazil's State Seed Producers and Dealers Association (Apassal) says thatthe country is being flooded with unregistered GM seed from Argentina,where 93% of production is genetically modified. Apassal estimatesplanting of GM grain will reach 45% of soy production in the country thisyear.An NFU spokesman said members were becoming increasingly concerned aboutthe sustainability of the multiples' anti-GM project. He said: "More andmore people are chasing a small quantity of product."Tesco, Asda and Sainsbury have been exploring alternative sources ofnon-GM soy from India, where the soy growers' association is keen to cashin on the growing demand by charging heavy premiums, he added."There are doubts about the cost effectiveness, but they're making a playfor the market. A big trade delegation came over last month."Monsanto communications director Tony Combes said: "It is becoming moreand more unsustainable to source GM free seed and there are heavy premiumson identity preserved seed from the US."The latest report from the US National Centre for Food and AgriculturalPolicy revealed 63% of the US soybean crop planted this year wasgenetically modified.Cargill seed director Martin Douglas said he was aware of illegal plantingin the south of Brazil but remained confident adequate quantities ofidentity preserved GM free product were available from the north for "atleast 12 months if not for some years to come. Certainly there is still apremium on non-GM soya relative to GM, but that premium has actuallydecreased over the last three to four months."Sainsbury said its suppliers were exploring alternative sources to Brazilalthough it was confident its traceability and verification procedureswould ensure no rogue soya would reach shelves.